About a month ago, Google announced Accelerated Mobile Pages, also known as AMP. It’s an initiative to speed up the mobile web by cutting the cruft from bloated webpages.

To find out if it worked, we tested standard mobile and AMP HTML pages from BBC News, The Guardian and BuzzFeed. Loading each on a simulated 3G connection yielded a surprising result. You might even say that AMP gave us a shock. (Sorry.)

How did the web react to AMP?

AMP has sparked conversations about mobile UX, Google’s goals, and the open nature of the web. It is fair to say that AMP is current. (I’ll show myself out.)

Our immediate reaction was cautionary. We commended AMP’s values, but recommended against jumping in with both feet. That didn’t stop us from dipping a toe in the water, mind, as we published the blog on a beta AMP template. Fast forward four weeks… and we have something to show you.

We are pleased to present the RocketMill AMP microsite:

www.rocketmill.co.uk/amp/

Our Accelerated Mobile Pages microsite, built in AMP HTML

Written about AMP, and written in AMP

Built in AMP HTML, the site answers your questions about Accelerated Mobile Pages by tackling them head on. You’ll learn how AMP works, where its limitations are, how to use it – and whether you should bother.

Speaking personally: as an exercise both technical and investigative, I’m proud of the site. It looks great on your mobile and pleasant enough on your desktop. It tracks basic analytics data without JavaScript. It embeds images, YouTube videos and social media content. None of this is groundbreaking, but that’s kind of the point.

AMP is a restrictive platform that wants to steal your already limited development time. And for now, it is only accessible via a demo version of Google – an audience of anoraks! We wanted to know if building AMP content was worth it. How difficult would it be for us, as ‘publishers’, to create a page that fulfilled our needs?

You may have wondered the same thing.

Any questions?

I hope you enjoy reading through the microsite as much as I enjoyed making it. If you have any questions, just send @RocketMill a tweet.